Author: Lori (Page 1 of 29)

Chocolate Roulette with Georgia Ramon

If you have never heard of playing chocolate roulette, it’s a game I’ve started with a group of friends in which I introduce them to a hot, spicy bar along with other bars by the same chocolate maker or brand. The first time I hosted a game of chocolate roulette I used the ghost pepper bar by Raaka as the “bullet”. You can learn more about that experience here. This time I finally got my hands on a Carolina Reaper bar by Georgia Ramon.

I had heard about this intriguing bar on Instagram several months ago, but by the time I had closed out of Instagram and looked online to order the bar for myself, it was sold out everywhere. It wasn’t until a trip to Germany this year that I was able to find it in person and of course, it was back in stock online as well. I wasn’t that familiar with Georgia Ramon, and roulette was the perfect opportunity to get a variety of their bars to try.

I thought it was interesting that most of the bars shared the roasting, grinding and conching information, though all of the bars here that did include the conching time all said “0 Hours” or “Without”. Some of these photos I took at the location of the chocolate roulette game, hence the difference in backgrounds and quality of photos.

Before I talk about the game experience, I’m going to briefly share about the bars individually. There’s no particular order in which I’m sharing them. The ghost pepper bar by Raaka didn’t have as much of a spicy kick as I expected, but this bar definitely had a kick! It was like a slow spicy burn that gradually increased, plateaued, then slowly dissipated in the finish.

The back of the packing listed the aroma as herby and “milky creamy”. The flavor notes were listed as raspberry, jasmine tea and nutty. It definitely smelled creamy, especially with the bar being a milk chocolate. Since I read jasmine tea as a flavor note, I was able to taste that as well. I didn’t quite detect any flavors that reminded me of raspberries but I did get a little bit of nuttiness.

The flavor notes included honey, roasted nuts, ripe fruits such as fig, plums and currant, and coffee. The chocolate smelled sweet, but it immediately tasted bright, fruity and it had a strong roasted nut flavor. The roasted nut flavor dominated over the fruity flavor as my bite melted. A fig-like flavor developed in the finish alongside the roasted nut.

This bar consisted of a blend with cardamom simply added to it. No other flavor notes were suggested on the back of the packaging. The scent of cardamom was easy to detect as well as the flavor. The cardamom gave a slow and gentle burn while the chocolate itself seemed chocolaty and then fruity like cherries toward the end.

The aroma notes included red fruits. The flavor notes included tart, “milky-creamy” and cardamom. The scent actually made me think of oregano. The flavor was like the “milky creamy” description they gave with a touch of fruitiness. Oreo cookies was what came to mind when I ate this! Maybe this would be like those Meiji strawberry biscuits I tried a couple of years ago. For a sweet, snacking chocolate, I like this a lot.

This bar is called Fahrenheit 264 since the beans were roasted at that temperature. The flavor notes were listed as lime, raspberry, nuts and spices. The chocolate smelled and tasted roasted to me.

The flavor notes were listed as lightly nutty, cereal, grapes, vanilla and fruity. The scent was lightly nutty and the chocolate tasted sweet, fruity and I could see why vanilla was listed as a flavor. Vanilla was not included in the ingredients list. I think it’s important to make a point of that since I know vanilla is sometimes added to chocolate, but in this case it was a natural flavor in the cocoa.

The aroma note was listed as floral and the flavor notes were listed as figs, cherries and nuts. The chocolate smelled earthy to me but tasted like lavender and roasted nuts. The chocolate became bitter as my bite melted. The roasted nut flavor remained in the finish.

Okay, now that we’ve gone through all of the bars, here’s how the game went down. On top of the plate I wrote numbers 1 through 8 and on the bottom of the plate I wrote down where I’d place a piece of each of the bars associated with their appropriate number. Each person was instructed to take a piece off of the plate and remember which number they took so I could later tell them which bar they had tried. Unfortunately one of our friends kept choosing the Carolina Reaper even though I shifted some of the pieces around to try to make him choose a different chocolate ­čÖé

After three rounds of roulette, everyone was naturally curious of how truly spicy the Carolina Reaper bar tasted. One person had difficulty finishing their bite while another of our friends ended up getting the hiccups. For people who have already been sampling spicy craft chocolate bars, the Carolina Reaper will definitely be tolerable. As someone who had to adjust to consuming spicy foods as an adult, I was able to handle the Carolina Reaper bar with no issues.

Out of the eight bars used for roulette, I enjoyed the Carolina Reaper, cardamom, Guatemala and Belize bars the most. I’m very glad to have finally tried the Carolina Reaper bar and to have experienced a truly spicy bar ­čÖé

Georgia Ramon: Made in Bonn, Germany

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Raaka First Nibs Selection – May 2018

I was looking forward to trying Raaka’s May First Nibs Selection since one of the bars was Turmeric Latte. I had just been trying such lattes by Peet’s Coffee, which were pretty good but unfortunately they were a seasonal release. Thankfully I managed to grab my last turmeric latte from Peet’s just in time to try it alongside Raaka’s bar.

The Turmeric Latte bar tasted very similar to the Peet’s Coffee golden milk turmeric latte. The husband also confirmed that both food items tasted very similar to each other. The turmeric latte chocolate bar first tasted sweet with subtle spiciness and savoriness. I was reminded of the flavor of yellow curry. The finish consisted of a lingering tingling feeling from spiciness. The overall flavor of this bar actually reminded me of Raaka’s carrot, lemon and thyme bar from a previous First Nibs Selection!

The French Toast bar smelled and initially tasted like toast with sugar on top. The toasty flavor had some mild brightness and fruitiness. The fruitiness makes sense since the description that came with these bars mentions Dominican beans being used. I didn’t taste any maple flavoring even though the description mentions maple sugar being used, but I did enjoy the crunchy texture of puffed quinoa and chia seeds. I took a second bite and it was during that time that I immediately tasted the maple and spice medley of cinnamon and nutmeg.

Both bars were delicious and neither lasted more than a day in my husband’s and my hands ­čÖé I hope Raaka makes another coffee-type inspired bar in the future!

Raaka: Made in Brooklyn, NY

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

The Cacao Bean Project

These bars were gifted to me by my mother since The Cacao Bean Project is based out of Sandy, UT. I’m already intrigued that they list the ingredients on the front of the bar rather than the back, and their address with phone number are included. Their package design is unique in putting all information on the front.

I had a hard time finding much information about The Cacao Bean Project, and their website doesn’t provide much backstory. One article posted a year ago mentions that the company was started by husband and wife team, Lance and Shannon Brown. It also mentions that Lance had been making chocolate prior to starting the company and he had been pushing for a chocolate making guild where makers can time-share equipment so “companies could save money with combined purchasing power”.

Another article mentions Lance saying his beans are “wood-smoked” rather than roasted.┬áThe cacao for making the Madagascar 74% bar are hickory smoked, as noted on the packaging. Sure enough the bar had a light smoky scent similar to bacon. My bite took a long time to melt, but eventually a mellow bright citrus flavor developed alongside a subtle smoky flavor. At the end of my bite I tasted mostly smokiness. Caputo’s tasted bright citrus, berry in the middle and then smokiness.

I have never tried a bar made with cacao sourced from Caranero. A quick Google search shows that Caranero is an island that’s part of Panama. This bar smelled like roasted nuts and earthy. The flavor started out sour and a little sharp like maybe blue cheese. As my bite melted I experienced acidity with roasted nut. The acidity mellowed out at the end and I was left with that nutty flavor. My experience was completely different from Caputo’s where they listed Deep cacao flavor, subtle cherry, floral with a hint of cinnamon” as their tasting notes.

Both bars were a bit dry for me, but otherwise I liked the subtlety of the Madagascar bar better. The Caranero was very interesting in that my tasting experience was completely different than Caputo’s. I’m curious to see how this company grows and what other bars they are/will produce.

The Cacao Bean Project: Made in Sandy, UT

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Raaka First Nibs Selection – April

Though my current Raaka First Nibs subscription is set up so I receive a package every other month, I’ve made exceptions since Raaka produces so many interesting bars. At the end of April I managed to grab a couple of the last swirl bars available. The description that came with this Selection says that Raaka was inspired by “the growing season, the planting of new seeds and the anticipation of fresh herbs, veggies and fruits to come”.

The Carrot, Lemon & Thyme swirl bar sounded very savory and made me think about the oven baked chicken I like to make whenever I get a couple of hours to prepare dinner. According to the Selection description, this bar was made using a combination of fruity Peruvian dark chocolate and dairy free white chocolate. Thyme was steeped in the cocoa butter for the dark chocolate, but the white chocolate was created with carrot and lemon powder. To obtain the swirl patter, the white chocolate was “dripped” into the dark chocolate and then swirled by hand.

The bar smelled herby, but I first tasted lemon followed by carrot. The thyme was subtle, which made me very happy. Some people love herby chocolate, but I can’t say I’m a huge fan. The sweetness from the Peruvian portion of the chocolate was clearly detectable despite the savoriness of the rest of the flavors. I’m pleasantly surprised on how this bar turned out! It was a balanced mixture of savory and sweet.

The Beet & Black Currant swirl bar was made similarly to the Carrot, Lemon & Thyme bar, except beet power, black currant and raspberries were used with the white chocolate. A Tanzanian base was used for its fruity, berry and mellow earthy notes. The berry scent from this bar is amazing! I first tasted raspberries and beets. As my bite melted, somehow the flavors melded into chocolaty-ness with berry. Toward the end, I experienced more of the beet flavor. I really, really liked this bar! I could eat the whole thing on my own ­čÖé

I’ve seen the Vanilla Rooibos Tea bar available for order online for a while, but I can’t recall if I’ve tried it before. I’ve noticed that lately the First Nibs Selections come with two very unique bars while the third is usually taken from their regular chocolate line. The bar had an earthy scent, the kind that’s like loose leaf tea. The flavor was tart, sweet and fruity, but not like tart cherries. It was like a cherry flavored Jolly Rancher. As my bite melted the earthy flavor of Rooibos tea peeked through a little bit. This bar was also delicious ­čÖé

I was impressed and amazed by the Carrot, Lemon & Thyme and Beet & Black Currant swirl bars. The Vanilla Rooibos Tea was also really good. I wouldn’t be surprised if all three of these bars disappear within a day or two ­čÖé I’m looking forward seeing what Raaka comes up with next!

Raaka Chocolate: Made in Brooklyn, NY

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

 

Minimal, Chocodongi and Pipiltin Cocoa from Damecacao

I love swapping bars with chocoholic friends and not even knowing what to expect in the mail! These came from Max, who is known as @damecacao on Instagram. I had seen from her pictures that she had been traveling in Japan and Korea and while there she generously picked up a couple of bars for me to try.

Minimal I had heard of as being a Japanese-based maker. According to Max’s note to me, their chocolate is made “minimally stone ground” in Tokyo. Minimal’s website with the help of Google Translate says that the first bars by Minimal had a “far more rough and more primitive finish” than the current bars. The translation seemed a bit choppy, but Minimal delves deeply into what it means to them to make chocolate, especially from a culturally Japanese perspective that I find deep and contemplative. You can read it for yourself here if you are interested. The scent of the bar was very fruity, almost like mangos. The flavor was also very fruity like a mixture of mango and subtle coconut. The texture was definitely grittier and made me think of Taza chocolate. It’s different and kind of refreshing to experience the rougher texture of this bar paired with fruitiness. I liked it a lot!

The Chocodongi bar is from Suwon, South Korea. Unfortunately Google was unable to translate their website┬áand I couldn’t find any articles about them, so I couldn’t get much information about them. The scent was like un-popped corn kernels. Tasting it resulted in immediate acidity and strong earthy notes. I can’t say I was a huge fan since I don’t gravitate toward acidic and earthy bars, but it was good to experience.

Pipiltin Cocoa’s website says the company was started by two sibling who love eating chocolate and their bars are made using beans from Indonesia. Their goal is to source cocoa beans to make their bars from all parts of Indonesia. I think it’s unique that they show not only drawings of each step in the chocolate making process, but they include the specific temperatures they use for tempering their chocolate. The front of the packaging lists the tasting notes as raisin and bright acidity. The chocolate had a roasted scent. I actually didn’t experience bright acidity, but something like a deep toasted bread flavor with very subtle fruitiness.

I enjoyed being able to finally try a Minimal bar and to try two other makers I had never heard of before! The Minimal bar was my favorite out of the three for it it’s texture and delightful fruity flavor. Thank you again, Max, for sharing these bars with me! Follow her on Instagram for more of her travels and chocolate adventures!

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Chocolate Negro Biol├│gico

I’m not sure what the official company name of this bar is because a Google search of “ChocoLate Org├íniko” resulted in a wide variety of bars other than this one. Searching for “Chocolate Negro Biol├│gico” helped me at least find the image and some kind of description associated with this bar. The back of the packaging consisted mainly of the ingredients listed out in multiple languages. There’s not much information to go off of except that this bar was made in Spain.

The best description I could find for this bar was that the cocoa comes from the Alto el Sol plantation in a Peruvian natural park. The tasting notes were listed as acidic, red fruit and “touches of olive”. I got a chocolatey and subtle fruity scent from the chocolate but a strong chocolate covered dried cherries flavor from it. I did not experience any acidity or olive. The chocolate was very smooth in texture and melted quickly.

And that’s basically all I can share about this bar because I have very, very little information to go off of.

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Potomac Chocolate – Sea Salt Caramel Bonbons

We’re not long past the D.C. Chocolate Festival at this point and while there, I made sure to stop by and say hi to a couple of makers who I knew and meet several who were new faces for the D.C. area. One of the familiar faces I said hi to was Ben Rasmussen of Potomac Chocolate. Ben is one of the few chocolate makers based out of Virginia, and he recently was able to fulfill his Kickstarter for a new print press, roaster and to create a new origin bar. If you want to learn more about the goals of his Kickstarter and for updates on how he’s doing with his equipment, go here!

I’ve shared several of Ben’s bars in the past here on Time To Eat Chocolate, but I heard rumors of his making bonbons. They’re not available on his website and I was starting to mentally accept that I might never try them, but thank goodness they were being sold at the Festival! While visiting his table, a group of other customers and I got to each sample a sea salt bonbon. Believe it or not, we all had the same reaction of, “Wow! This is good!” So of course I had to bring a box home ­čÖé

I experienced a flood of sweetness from the caramel, deep cocoa flavor that seemed naturally fruity (I forgot to ask Ben which chocolate he used for the shell) and a touch of sea salt. Pretty much everyone knows what sea salt caramels are like, so I there’s not much I can say except that these are addictive! If in the future these are sold in larger quantities, I’ll be getting one for myself to binge eat on a relaxing day ­čÖé

Potomac Chocolate: Made in Woodbridge, VA

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

 

Map Chocolate

I ordered this Belize 80% bar along with Mackenzie River’s Power for the Pink bar, which was absolutely delicious by the way. (If you didn’t know, Mackenzie is the maker behind Map Chocolate.) I was very curious about the inclusion combination. I would never have thought to include cashew butter with mint, let alone coconut with mint, or coconut with cashew butter. It’s unique and so of course I wanted to try it for myself.

The description Mackenzie included with this bar said she wanted to take away some of the “brittle edginess” that “many very dark chocolates” have, and tried using this flavor combination to bring “peaks of light” to the chocolate. She also says that this bar made her think of the Game of Thrones television show. She includes some lyrics:

“Was it just a game to you?

But I’m in so deep

You know I’m such a fool for you

You’ve got me wrapped around your finger

You know I thought the world of you”

She also references a story by Shakespeare called Titus Andronicas, but I’m not familiar with that story and never had to write a paper on it as she jokes about, so I’m going to go on with my thoughts from tasting the bar.

I could smell the coconut as it was sprinkled on the back and a little bit of the mint. I first tasted the cashew butter followed by the coconut. The texture was smooth aside from the coconut bits. The mint flavor came in sort of strong and I was reminded of candy canes. The combo reminded me of those Bounty candy bars but with the addition of a touch of mint. The combo is very unique and admire the bold combo!

Map Chocolate: Made in Eugene, OR

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

 

Zotter Chocolates and Mitzi Blue

I grabbed the Gin Zitronic bar at Chocolate & More in Munich, Germany (who had an amazing Zotter collection), because it’s flavor combo sounded like gin and tonic. From the gin and tonics my husband makes, they contain gin, lemon and tonic. What I’m amused by is the back of the packaging containing the warning that this bar contains alcohol. I cannot see such a bar being openly sold in the U.S. due to this warning since the U.S. has such strict alcohol regulations. It reminded me of the German version of NyQuil, called MediNait, I had to get while staying there to get over my cold. There was a version of MediNait with alcohol and one without. The ingredients list was only in German, so the bits I could read were that this bar contains lemon juice (zitronensaft), lemon concentrate (zitronensaftkonzentrat), grapefruit concentrate (grapefruitkonzentrat), soy lecithin (sojalecithin) and gin (gin). Once I opened the wrapper, the appearance of the bar reminded me of those chocolate covered protein or breakfast bars.

The chocolate had a soft break and inside I could see two layers of filling: a lighter lemon cream layer and a gin ganache layer. Unfortunately I forgot to take a photo of the inside before consuming this bar. I could definitely smell the gin, some lemon and chocolaty-ness. The texture also reminded me of soft nougat bars I’ve had in the past with chewy bits possibly made up of lemon. I got the slow burn of gin with a light zing of lemon and the warmth of chocolate. The gin lingered ┬áin the aftertaste. Neither the gin nor the lemon were too strong for me or prevented me from enjoying the chocolate itself. The husband really liked this bar! I’m not a fan of drinking gin and tonic beverages, but I had a pleasant experience trying it in chocolate form.

At first glance, the Mitzi Blue bar doesn’t look like itÔÇÖs by Zotter, but in smaller vertical print it says ÔÇťZotter SchokoladenÔÇŁ on the front! The combo of mango with what I believe means wild berries (waldbeeren, Wald = wood, beeren = berries) piqued my interest. The description inside of the packaging is all in German. What I can gather is that some kind of car was involved in collaborating or being the inspiration to create this line of bars, but unfortunately I don’t know enough German to understand it all and the Zotter website doesn’t address this either. I liked how they say in the description that they r├Âsten, mahlen, walzen and conchieren their cacao (roast, grind, roll, conche).

This chocolate bar is unique in shape and appearance. The combined scent of sweet berries with mango reminded me of nuts. As my bite melted, I first tasted bright mango with creamy milk chocolate before the sweet and tart berry flavor developed. There was a party in my mouth with the fruitiness of mango with the berries danced about. The creaminess of white chocolate and tartness from the mango and berries lingered in the aftertaste. The darker central circle tasted predominantly of berries. This was a delicious bar and it woke me up as I was trying this bar while feeling sleepy ­čÖé

Both bars were unique for me and I’m glad I picked them up! I almost didn’t as I know I can order other Zotter bars online from the U.S.

Zotter Chocolates: Made in Austria

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Chocolate Sample Medley

In my previous post, I had received several samples from a fellow blogger and chocoholic friend, Victoria Cooksey. She was generous in sending me multiple samples of not only 100% bars from her personal chocolate stash, but from bars ranging from 60% to 75%. After tasting several 100% bars, these all tasted very sweet and gave my palate a needed break from intense cocoa flavors.

Mission Chocolate 75% Brazil with dried cupua├žu – This chocolate smelled very fruity due to the cupua├žu and like Victoria mentioned in her review, it smelled very much like mango. With the cupua├žu side down on my tongue it also tasted so much like dried mangoes. The chocolate itself was smooth and melted quickly. The cupua├žu was much stronger in flavor and overpowered the chocolate, but I enjoyed the bar anyway! Victoria is very good at picking out flavor and aroma notes and I recommend taking a look at her thoughts here!

Raphio 72% Ecuador – This chocolate smelled chocolatey and nutty. The flavor was strongly nutty, like roasted unsalted almonds. It melted so smoothly and it quickly melted in my mouth. I would get this bar in its full sized form since I enjoyed the flavor and texture!

TCHO 68% umami microbatch with black garlic, seaweed, shiitake and sea salt – The chocolate smelled like the spice drawer my family had while growing up. I could pick out the scent of garlic and savory, earthiness of seaweed and shiitake. I first tasted shiitake soon followed by seaweed and a touch of garlic and salt. The flavor combination reminded me of a powdered ramen stock my husband and I tried to make which consisted of garlic, kombu seaweed and bacon. The salt lingered in the aftertaste. Definitely an umami flavor combination and delicious! Victoria smelled earthiness, pepper, seawater and black lava salt (she’s very good at pinpointing flavors!). She tasted salt, caramelized garlic, cocoa, sesame seed cracker and experienced a long garlic finish.

Intrigue Chocolate 64% rosemary, blackberry, honey, alderwood smoked sea salt – I could definitely smell smokiness from this chocolate, but I first tasted rosemary and sea salt. Maybe because of the honey the flavors started to remind me of sea salt caramels. I didn’t pick up any of the blackberry. It’s always interesting when comparing tasting notes with fellow chocoholics because on Instagram Victoria smelled rosemary, lavender, honey and honeysuckle and tasted lavender, rosemary, salt and savoriness.

Xocolatl 60% Love and Happiness blood orange, olive oil and raspberry – I could smell and taste citrus from blood orange. As my bite melted, the raspberry came out strong. The olive oil was harder for me to detect. My husband also tried this and said he tasted mainly raspberry but had already eaten his piece before realizing he tasted the blood orange as well. This was really good and I would eat an entire bar of this stuff!

After sampling a lot of 100% bars in the previous posts, these sweeter bars were a nice welcome back into my chocolate comfort zone ­čÖé I enjoyed trying all of them, especially the Raphio and Xocolatl. Victoria Cooksey writes the blog Dark Chocolate Matters Reviews. More of her thoughts on various chocolate products can be found on Instagram and on YouTube.

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

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