I’m not sure what the official company name of this bar is because a Google search of “ChocoLate Orgániko” resulted in a wide variety of bars other than this one. Searching for “Chocolate Negro Biológico” helped me at least find the image and some kind of description associated with this bar. The back of the packaging consisted mainly of the ingredients listed out in multiple languages. There’s not much information to go off of except that this bar was made in Spain.

The best description I could find for this bar was that the cocoa comes from the Alto el Sol plantation in a Peruvian natural park. The tasting notes were listed as acidic, red fruit and “touches of olive”. I got a chocolatey and subtle fruity scent from the chocolate but a strong chocolate covered dried cherries flavor from it. I did not experience any acidity or olive. The chocolate was very smooth in texture and melted quickly.

And that’s basically all I can share about this bar because I have very, very little information to go off of.

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.