All three of these Pump Street bars were courtesy of my mom, whose nearby Harmon’s store has an excellent stock of chocolate! She originally tried to send me the sourdough + sea salt and rye crumb, milk + sea salt bars during the summer, but they melted during transit and I attempted to re-temper one of the bars. My mom decided to send the same bars again, and later she mailed me the Honduras bread + butter bar, which I’m very excited to try!

What’s unique about Pump Street is that they make both bread and craft chocolate. I’ve said before that coffee, tea and berries make wonderful marriages with chocolate, and I hadn’t thought much about bread + chocolate until I had Potomac Chocolate’s toasted sourdough bread chocolate bar, which was amazing! With their strong bakery background, I strongly believe that they know exactly which breads to pair with single origin chocolate.

This bar is made using cacao from Ecuador, specifically the Hacienda Limon farm as listed on the packaging on the Pump Street website. You can read more about their description about the farm here, and I recommend it since it’s a good read, but what I find interesting is that this farm incorporated a pre-drying step to decrease acidity in the cocoa beans compared to when the beans were immediately fermented. The back of the packaging says that this bar is the second in their bakery series, and that the tasting notes are creamy chocolate with nuttiness and acidity from the rye bread. The bar smelled creamy and sour to me, like goat milk chocolate. I tasted sea salt with creaminess of the chocolate first. A slightly sour flavor developed as my bite melted and there was a pleasant crunchy texture from the rye crumbs. Toward the end I was able to taste nuttiness mixed with sea salt and that light sour flavor. I did not experience any astringency from this bar.

This bar uses the same cacao as the rye bar, though this time the back of the package listed malt flavor. The chocolate definitely had a malty scent. The flavor was also of malt, creaminess and with crunchy bits from the sourdough bread. As my bit melted, I experienced some bitterness with strong malt flavor. Toward the end I tasted only malt with some sea salt and nuttiness.

This bar is made with cacao from Honduras, specifically from the Finca Tres MarĂ­as estate. The family that owns this property were the first to bring a cacao plantation to their local area. You can read more about their story here. The back of the packaging lists creamy and caramel notes for the chocolate and “malty, hot buttered toast,” which sounds delicious! This bar smelled malty and slightly buttery. The flavor was more buttery than malty, which I really enjoyed. I prefer malt as a light flavor than in-your-face. As my bite melted, the chocolate literally tasted like buttered toast. It was crazy! I could close my eyes and imagine myself eating it without the crunchy texture of toast.

Honestly hands down my favorite bar was the Honduras Bread & Butter bar because the flavor experience of the chocolate literally tasting like buttered toast was mind blowing. Even in the aftertaste I was thinking about it 🙂

Pump Street Bakery: Made in Orford, Suffolk, UK

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.