Puna Chocolate

After hearing and briefly meeting the chocolate makers behind Puna Chocolate during the D.C. Chocolate Festival, I had to order some of their bars. I didn’t have time to purchase any in person, so I placed a couple of orders for their half-size bars online.

Despite being based out of Wauconda, IL, Puna Chocolate owns a cacao farm in Puna, Hawaii. As mentioned on the back of their plain 70% bar, Puna first planted cacao in the Puna District in 2012. Also mentioned on the packaging is the reason why Hawaii is the only state where cacao can both grow and produce cacao is due to the volcanic soil and tropical climate. Proceeds go toward supporting Hawaiian agriculture.

I’m going to start with tasting Puna’s plain 70% dark chocolate. The scent was wonderful and seemed to be a mixture of fruity/berry and nutty. The flavor exploded in my mouth of fruitiness and nuttiness. While I’m tasting, the screen door is open and I’m listening to the rain fall outside. My memories took me back to the time when I was visiting a rural part of Dominican Republic and I was thinking of the wonderful smell of being surrounded by tropical trees and trying local sweet fruit. I loved this bar!

The cashews and Hawaiian sea salt bar smelled like the plain 70% bar but it was chomp-friendly with delicious cashews and plenty of sea salt. Besides the cashews the sea salt gave a light crunchy texture. It’s a good snacking bar combining two healthy things: nuts and chocolate 🙂

See the pictures above for the pepper and spice ingredients as well as the interesting description for the The Kilauea Volcano Style bar. I could smell and taste the spice medley. It took a little bit of time but eventually my mouth was on fire. The crunchy nibs were helpful in distracting me from the burn. It’s not for the weak of heart but it’s also not too hot. At the end I experienced not just the heat but I could taste the Aleppo pepper, which was nice.

The back of the packaging says, “Fresh golden Macadamia Nuts are roasted to a gentle nutty crunch and combined with crispy coconut flakes for a sweet and salty pairing.” Coconut was forefront in scent and flavor but I could taste macadamia in the background. I find coconut to be relatively savory and combined with the savory roasted macadamia nuts, the sweet and salty combo had more of a subtle saltiness. This was still a delicious combination!

I love coffee + chocolate combinations! Also my brother has visited Kona multiple times and loves Kona coffee, so this made me think of him. The bar had a light fruity scent but the flavor was coffee, nibby (from the nibs), and fruity. Since I’m trying this on a rainy day this bar helped me wake up. It was like consuming a cup of cold brew coffee with a fruity aftertaste. I liked this bar!

The back of the Horchata bar says that this dark milk bar contains less sugar than the 70% dark bar and the dairy used is sourced from the midwest. The flavor was chocolaty with milk creaminess and a touch of cinnamon. The texture of the crispy rice was light. The spiciness of this bar was minimal so it’s perfect for those who have a low spice tolerance but enjoy a sweeter chocolate bar. I could easily eat this bar in one sitting, but I’ve promised to share this with a fellow chocoholic.

The scent of rose and pistachio from the Rose Cardamom Pistachio bar had a calming affect. The rose was the most obvious flavor. I could taste the cardamom as well, which was never overpowering. The pistachio gave a nice light, crunchy texture. A great bar for winding down from a busy day!

To make this Honey Wine Berry bar, Puna let raspberries soak in wine then dried and pressed them into the chocolate. I could smell the raspberries and sweetness of honey. Right away I was in love with this bar! The sweetness of the honey and chocolate nicely balanced out the touch of tartness from the wine raspberries. I could definitely see myself enjoying a full sized version of this bar.

Out of the bars I tried, my top favorites are the Honey Wine Berry, 70% plain, Kona Coffee with Nibs, and Rose Cardamom Pistachio. The Honey Wine Berry might be my number one favorite out of the ones I just listed.

Puna Chocolate: Cacao grown in Hawaii, Bars made in Wauconda, IL

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

 

Fruition 100% and Irving Farm Coffee Bars

It’s been a while since I’ve had some Fruition chocolate so during the 2018 D.C. Chocolate Festival I stopped by Fruition’s table, said hello to Emma working there and picked these two bars up.

The 100% bar has been recommended to me by multiple people and while my taste buds have yet to fully appreciate 100% bars, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to at least give it a try. The scent of this bar reminded me of cocoa powder and it was little fruity. The flavor strongly reminded me of cocoa powder but quickly developed into raspberry and tannic flavors. The strong cocoa flavor remained through the end of my bite. Despite my not yet being in love with 100% bars I do appreciate that this had some natural raspberry flavor to help balance out the tannic.

The Irving Farm coffee bar has a subtle coffee scent and it tasted lightly fruity and in general like coffee, which I really liked! The chocolate itself also tasted subtle and chocolaty. It was smooth and delicious. The fruitiness lingered into the aftertaste. I would definitely get another of these!

Fruition: Made in Shokan, NY

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Raaka First Nibs Selection – July

This month Raaka produced two summer drink-related bars: Mojito and Thai Iced Tea. Technically both could be consumed all year around, but both of these types of drinks sound good for the ~90 degree weather the D.C. area has been experiencing. Though the Cabernet Sauvignon bar was also included in this month’s First Nibs I will not be sharing it here. I can already say that I recommend it since I’ve eaten several Cabernet Sauvignon bars in the past.

The description included with these bars says the Thai Iced Tea bar is made with a Kokoa Kamili, Tanzanian base “infused with a cacao butter tincture of assam tea, mango ceylon tea, cardamom and star anise” making the base flavors for Thai iced tea. A quick Google search shows the definition of tincture is “a medicine made by dissolving a drug in alcohol” or “a slight trace of something”. This makes me think of previous Raaka bars where the cocoa butter/cacao butter was infused with various spices or other flavorings. Raaka makes a note that though Thai iced tea is usually sweetened with sugar and condensed milk and they wanted to keep the bar vegan, they used cane sugar and coconut instead.

The scent of the bar actually made me think of nutmeg but it was definitely a warm spice blend. My taste buds were washed over with warm spicy deliciousness. As Raaka described, the chocolate tasted creamy and I could detect some of that coconut. It’s been a couple of months since I’ve had Thai iced tea, this bar is reminiscent of it though a little on the less sweet side. I could definitely taste the coconut and spices in the aftertaste.

Raaka’s description of the Mojito bar mentions that the base is made up of Asochivite, Guatemala cacao for it’s fruity and nutty flavors. The nibs were aged in rum barrels from Van Brunt Stillhouse for 4 weeks. The nibs were then “blended with lime peel powder and peppermint-spearmint infused cacao butter creating a tangy, complex, cooling dark chocolate”.

The scent was lightly fruity but I was able to taste lime right away. The bar literally tastes like a mojito including the alcoholic flavor! Personally I feel like a lot of alcoholic beverages have a “bite” to them. This bar managed to include that, probably due to the peppermint-spearmint flavors. My mind has been blown. I can’t believe this bar literally tastes like a mojito! My mind has been blown so long that my bite finished melting…

Once again Raaka has created two very unique flavor experiences in the form of chocolate. The Thai iced tea was something different, but I can’t wrap my head around the fact that a chocolate bar could taste so much like a mojito. I may be thinking about the Mojito bar for the rest of summer 🙂

Raaka: Made in Brooklyn, NY

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Chocolate Roulette with Wm. Chocolate Bars

During a visit to see my siblings and some extended family I took the chance to play a game of chocolate roulette with them. There were exactly five of us meeting for dinner and I had that number of Wm. Chocolate bars in my personal chocolate stash. Before I dive into sharing how the roulette game went, I want to share my own thoughts on tasting the 100% Honduras, 75% Ghana and the limited 68% Belize hot sauce infused bar, which acted as the bullet. For my thoughts on the first and second harvest of the 68% Belize (NOT hot sauce infused) bars, you can see my comparison of the two here.

I had tried William’s 100% bar prior to this game, but I never shared my thoughts. As mentioned on the packaging, the cocoa comes from Wampusirpi in the northeastern part of Honduras and because the beans are not treated with chemicals they are technically organic despite the lack of official certification. The tasting notes are listed as walnut, elderberry and gruyere. Because my allergies have been terrible lately I won’t bother trying to figure out what I’m smelling from each of the bars I’m sharing today 🙂 And because my sinuses aren’t handling the onslaught of pollen well, my tasting might be a little off as well. I immediately tasted that cheese-like flavor mentioned on the packaging as well as walnut. Maybe it’s me, but I’ve been tasting a lot of walnut and general nutty flavors in the bars I’ve been trying lately. I’m not sure what elderberry tastes like, but cheese was the top flavor I experienced in this bar. It’s very unique and as someone whose taste buds are still adjusting to 100% cocoa bars, this isn’t bad at all! If I’m wanting a more savory snack, I’ll be turning to this bar in the next few days until it’s gone.

The description on the back of the Ghana bar packaging mentions that Ghana harvests about 15% of the global crop. That’s a decent chunk when considering many of the other countries 20 degrees north and south of the equator that also grow and produce cacao/cocoa. William makes a point to mention that the cocoa used in this bar comes from “Ghanian farms that meet the Rainforest Alliance’s social, economic and environmental standards.” The flavor notes are listed as chocolate pudding, malt and peanut butter. My interest is already piqued at “peanut butter” since I’m a huge fan of chocolate + peanut butter 🙂 I immediately got those peanut butter flavors when the chocolate started melting, so I’ve been hooked! As my bite melted the chocolate started to taste more fudgy and I can see how it would be reminiscent of chocolate flavored Snack Packs. I really like this bar! I definitely plan on ordering more of this in the fall along with any first harvest 68% Belize that may be left.

The 68% Belize hot sauce infused bar I was able to get thanks to Will sharing it during the D.C. Chocolate Festival, otherwise I’d probably have no other way of obtaining it. Thank you, Will, for being willing to let me try this limited edition bar! It was perfect for roulette since it clearly has a spicy kick. The heat slowly intensifies as the chocolate melts and at the end the back of my back my throat was taking the brunt of the spiciness. I wish more of these bars were made since I’d keep a few in my stash for times when I need a wake-up jolt 🙂

Okay, on to the game of roulette! My siblings and a couple members of extended family had heard of this game before, but they had never played it themselves. The first time around, my brother-in-law got the hot sauce piece but was able to handle the heat very well. The second time around my brother got the bullet and seemed to be outwardly fine. The third time around my sister unfortunately picked the hot sauce chocolate and had to run for water since she doesn’t prefer spicy foods. My brother-in-law’s sister never experienced the heat and preferred not to.

After three rounds of roulette everyone got the chance to freely pick and choose which bars they wanted to try. The consensus was that my siblings and extended family liked both the first and second harvest 68% Belize bars for their fruity flavors. They were not fans of the 100% bar because the weren’t sure what to expect and are not used to trying higher than 70% bars. My brother was the only other person enjoying the Ghana bar as much as I did.

So there we have it! I finally got some of my family members involved in a game of roulette. They thankfully enjoyed it and want to play again sometime in the future. For more of my thoughts on trying Wm. Chocolate bars, go here.

Wm. Chocolate: Made in Madison, WI

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

 

Wm. Chocolate – Comparing Two Harvests of Belize

I know that cacao is harvested in the summer and the fall, but I’ve never had the chance to compare two harvests of the same cacao in chocolate bar form until now. When Will of Wm. Chocolate announced that his Belize bar was available in separate harvests of cacao from the Maya Mountains, I wanted to try both bars side by side.

When looking at the packaging of the first Belize bar harvested in 2016, the tasting notes are listed on the back as blackberry, custard and candied pineapple. The bar smelled like tropical fruits to me, and the flavor was a burst of subtle earthiness and tropical fruits (like mango). As my bite melted the flavors turned into cheese (like gouda) and what reminded me of sourdough bread. In the finish I continued to experience that cheese flavor with fruitiness and subtle candied pineapple. The cheese remained as an aftertaste for a long time. The chocolate melted smoothly and quickly and provided an exciting flavor story!

The second harvest was in 2017 and the tasting notes are listed as candied pineapple, custard and raisin. Maybe because cheese is now on my mind it’s mainly what I smelled from this bar along with subtle fruitiness. Immediately I tasted cheese, mild acidity, and subtle fruity flavors. The cheese, acidity and very subtle fruitiness stuck with me through the end of my bite. I had to take a second bite because my mind was still taking in the different pattern in flavor development compared to the first Belize bar. I took our cat Choco on a walk to give my taste buds a break, then took my second bite, and experienced the same unfolding of a flavor story except this time I experienced more of that candied pineapple flavor midway through my bite.

I’m blown away by the differences between these two bars! For me, the first harvest was more fruity and the second was overall more savory. I kind of like the first harvest of Belize better, but as I’m continuing to try the second harvest it is definitely growing on me! I think it won’t be long before the first harvest bars will sell out and I’ll be consuming the second harvest at the same rate and liking it just as much.

I had my husband taste both of these bars as well for a second opinion. In the first harvest bar he tasted the blackberry and in general a lot of fruitiness and some of that custard. In the second harvest bar he first tasted coffee followed by fruitiness (he worded it as “light fruitiness”) with possibly some of that raisin flavor.

If you want to read my thoughts on other bars I’ve tried by Will and my first time experiencing the first harvest Belize bar, go here.

Wm. Chocolate: Made in Madison Wisconsin

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

 

Ohiyo

I was able to try Ohiyo for the first time thanks to a fellow chocoholic friend who is originally from Ohio, which is where Ohiyo is based 🙂

Ohiyo was started in 2014 by Mike Condo who simply wanted to make the best chocolate bar he could and as simply as possible. His journey into making his own chocolate was also propelled by his suffering from Crohn’s disease and needing to cut soy and processed sugars out of his diet. He started making his own chocolate as a way to still be able to enjoy it. He uses his company to share good chocolate with the central Ohio community where he’s been raised. At this time he doesn’t ship any orders outside of Ohio.

In this excellent Q&A with Mike, I love his description of how craft chocolate makers are different from industrial chocolate companies: “Even though many large chocolate manufacturers do start with raw cocoa beans, they usually are not considered bean to bar chocolate makers. This is due to the fast processing times, automated procedures, and high level of additives in the finished chocolate.” This is a great explanation for people who aren’t entirely convinced that craft chocolate is different from industrial chocolate! At the time of this Q&A (2014) Mike mentions that he only uses cacao from the Moho Valley region of Belize due to its flavor. But that has clearly changed as my chocoholic friend has shared with me a 74% Tien Giang, Vietanam bar.

The tasting notes on the back of the packaging list dried cherries, honey and warm spice. I could smell cherry, sweet honey and spice from this bar. The flavor was a little nibby, cherry and what kind of reminded me of the scent pipe tobacco. The spice and some acidity developed as my bite melted. The finish consisted of that same pipe tobacco flavor from the beginning. I can’t say I experienced honey, but it was a good bar! Thanks to the same gracious chocoholic friend I was able to try Mike’s Coffee Dark Chocolate bar, which was insanely delicious! I ate that bar so quickly that I barely had time to think about it.

As a final note regarding Ohiyo, the name comes from the “Iroquois name for ‘great river,’ a word Condo came across while researching the history of Ohio and chocolate, which was originally a Native American food.” I’m looking forward to hopefully trying more of Mike’s bars in the future.

Ohiyo: Made in Columbus, Ohio

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Mirzam

I had been longing to get my hands on some Mirzam for at least a year. Their inclusions are unique and the packaging is gorgeous! I even reached out to Mirzam to find out how I could purchase a bar and learned that Mirzam is currently not being sold in the United States. It was thanks to Cocoa Runners I was finally able to try a one of their bars.

On Mirzam and the Cocoa Runner’s website we learn that the ship on the front of the wrapper pays homage to the Middle East being in the center of spice trade (since Mirzam is based out of Dubai). The flavors and cacao origins come from inspiration of the maritime routes taken by those traders. Currently their bars are made using cacao from Vietnam, Indonesia, Madagascar, Papua New Guinea and India. What’s very unique about Mirzam is their wrappers are created by hand by various artists and they even accept applications if anyone with artistic talent is interested.

This 62% dark bar was infused with damask rose from Bulgaria. Mirzam’s description includes a customer commenting that the bar reminded them of Turkish delight. Though Mirzam says this bar isn’t overpowering in florals, I think the rose scent and flavor was a bit strong. It did however bring up fond memories of some rose water my Oma (“grandmother” in German) gave my sister and I many years ago. I tried this bar on separate days. On the first day my senses were filled with rose. The second day of trying it in the morning I was able to enjoy the Ghana chocolaty base and I experienced a brownie-like finish.

I’m interested in trying more Mirzam bars at some point. I’m sad that I can’t access a wider range of Mirzam bars. I hope they will become available in the United States soon!

Mirzam: Made in Dubai

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Tabal Chocolate

It is thanks to William Marx of Wm. Chocolate that I heard about Tabal Chocolate. William remembered that I LOVE matcha in chocolate and mentioned Tabal’s Teahouse Matcha bar to me. Tabal is a small batch chocolate maker that was started in 2012 by Dan Bieser. Their retail store was opened in April 2017 where they offer chocolate making and truffle making classes. According to their website their logo comes from the shape of the stones they use for grinding their cocoa.

I had already broken into the Teahouse Matcha bar a couple of days prior to writing this post, but also as I’m writing I’ve almost finished the whole bar! The scent of matcha is subtle from this bar but I can definitely taste the matcha. The back of the packaging describes it as being “sweet, creamy and energizing”. I think it’s accurate. There’s no bitterness at all. It’s rare to find a dark chocolate bar with matcha too since the majority of matcha chocolate bars use white chocolate as the base. (Though the front of the packaging says this bar contains 58% cocoa, there’s no mention of any milk powder being used in the ingredients list.)  Somehow Tabal has made this dark chocolate and matcha pairing work and it’s absolutely delicious!

The chai bar had a pleasant and very present chai scent. The description on the back of the bar says it has a “hint of spice” but boy am I getting a slap in the face! I don’t mind this since I love drinking chai lattes. The flavor of cinnamon was strong.

Though I liked both bars, I’m completely hooked on the matcha bar! It’s so bad that I keep thinking about it, which is amazing! When I’ve made more of a dent in my chocolate stash and when cooler weather rolls around again, I definitely plan on ordering another matcha bar or two. I recommend it if you are a fan of matcha!

Tabal Chocolate: Made in Milwaukee, MI

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

Areté

I learned of AretĂ© through fellow chocolate blogger Trish of Eating the Chocolate Alphabet. I’ve also seen this name floating around Instagram several times, so I wanted to try a bar for myself. AretĂ© was started started by David and Leslie Senk in 2014 and the name comes from the Greek word for “excellence”. They make their chocolate in small batches, sometimes roasting only 6 pounds of cacao at a time and only making 100 bars per batch. They were featured in a Forbes slideshow of “The Most Delicious Chocolates To Buy Now”, though Forbes needs to work out which pictures are paired with which bars because it’s a complete mess!

The scent of this bar reminded me of fruity coffee, just like the Birdie Blend coffee I just tried from Rare Bird Coffee Roasters 🙂 (Not sponsored, by the way! Just a fan of their coffee.) I experienced a strong raisin flavor that turned chocolaty and slightly tannic as my bite melted. In my second bite I tasted a roasted flavor that developed as my bite melted and mild acidity but I still tasted the raisin.

I liked this bar a lot! It didn’t last long in my hands and I’m convinced that I definitely need to try more AretĂ© bars when I next get the chance!

Areté: Made in Milpitas, CA

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

 

Krak Chocolade

No, the title of this post is not misspelt. Krak is based out of the Netherlands, hence the spelling of the word “chocolate”. From Cocoa Runners I learned that the founder, Mark Schimmel, started working in the kitchen at the young age of 14 cleaning chocolate bowls used by pastry chefs. After becoming a pastry chef himself and working extensively with couverture chocolate, he wanted to explore the bean to bar process to understand how couverture was made. After purchasing a cocoa grinder from Dutch cacao trader Daarnhouwer, Krak began in 2013. The name comes from his taking a “crack” at making his own chocolate. I love how in Mark’s interview with Cocoa Runners he says he’s on a mission to “convince people that chocolate is not a candy”! Amen!

Cocoa Runner’s description for the Colombia Cordoba 70% bar says that the beans were lightly roasted and the chocolate experienced a “medium conche“, though I’m not sure what that means. Their tasting experience was that the bar had a strong body with a medium acidity, low bitterness, wine, red fruit and oak flavors. Mine was very different. The bar smelled like mangos and tasted like mangos. The medium acidity I did experience. The overall flavor reminded me of the aftertaste one experiences after having drunk orange juice. In a nutshell it’s the only way I can really describe it!

I liked this bar and I love Mark’s mission to help people understand that chocolate is like wine and cheese. It’s to be savored and not simply chomped on like candy. Thank you for your contribution in educating the public about chocolate, Mark!

Krak Chocolade: Made in Amsterdam, Netherlands

These are my personal thoughts and experiences. I did not receive pay or any compensation for reviewing any products. Though at the time of writing this post I am working in the chocolate industry, my work in the chocolate industry has no affect on my personal thoughts and experiences with the chocolate products shared on Time To Eat Chocolate. Website links to articles, companies and other sources of information directly related to the topic written within the posts were included during the time of writing and the writer will not be held responsible for future changes on such website links. All images are original and the property of Time To Eat Chocolate unless specifically stated otherwise.

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